partlyopenbook: Not me. :) (Default)
//Writing//

The Pickled Pirate is still a work-in-progress. It's now over 50,000 words in length. I've been working very hard on it... Nearing the end, however, but now I kind of wish I had the solid ambition to make a series out of it. Maybe it will be, one day! 

Also, the story has a new title. The title will be a secret until ... until it isn't a secret anymore! (Evil cackle here.)


//Writing Coincidence//

One of my favorite things in life are those potholes of space and time and words I call A Writing Coincidence. In which I will write something, somehow slip into a Jungian consciousness in which I know things that all others know, whether they're dead or alive, and it will appear in my story. This has happened before. There's even a tag for it on this journal.

The Pickled Pirate takes place in May, 1931 in Toronto, Canada. While writing yesterday, which I figured was about the 31st of May in the story, the characters kept complaining about how hot it was. Edmond, the protagonist, said to his boss, "It's unseasonably warm." Meanwhile, all our wee constable Edmond wants to do is get out of his uniform to stop the unfortunate but natural occurrence of ass-sweat (poor Edmond). Or stick his feet in Lake Ontario...

So I wondered... Was it really that hot in Toronto in May, 1931?

Yes. Yes, it was.

According to the weather archives, which I accessed using this site, on May 28th and 29th of 1931, it was 28.9C (about 84F) degrees both days. On the 30th and 31st, the temperature returned to a more comfortable and average 17.8C and 19.4C.

That's pretty interesting. I say, stroking my somewhat imaginary goatee.

What's even more interesting is that two days before in the story, it'd rained a little. According to the archives, it rained a little two days before. And it was foggy one evening, but fog isn't mentioned in the archives... We will never know if it was!

I'm more accurate at predicting the weather in 1931 than I am the proper dates in my story, it seems. I might have to make some edits so it ties together well! 

Whenever I write historical stories, I always try to use proper dates. For instance, I say in the story that May 26, 1931 is a Tuesday: I will check and make sure that May 26, 1931 was, in fact, a Tuesday. It was. (Not that I'm implying I'm the only one who does this, or that I am, to borrow from Snape, "an insufferable know-it-all...")

I try to do this with weather, too. This might stem from the fact that I'm a weather nerd. Or it's a druid thing, IDK... Or both!

If you ever read The Information Man, you'll see that they argue a little about the uncertainty of Thanksgiving. Even in Canada, like their southern neighbor the USA, they hadn't decided on a proper date for Thanksgiving.

I've also noticed lately that, when I'm writing (like actually sitting down for hours and working on something), I tend to look up a bit of research about six times during that writing span. It might be anything. A word. Whether Sweden was in World War I (no, they weren't). What color of fedora was popular in 1931 (Detective Ferris's is "fawn" colored). But, yeah, I'll have about six items of research on any given writing day...

If I finally do finish The Pickled Pirate after months of working on it, we should all give our silent thanks to Misha Collins, who plays an impeccable Detective Ferris in my head. Before that started, I was really struggling to get a grip on the characters...

Big Toronto.

Friday, 2 January 2015 15:18
partlyopenbook: pinkie pie pony leaps into frame (happy)
 I've spent the last couple of days working hard on The Pickled Pirate. It's coming along nicely. How relieving it is to a person's conscience when she knows she can achieve what she wants with a bit of hard work. It is so easy to fall into the dreamless patterns of laziness and indolence. Not this time, though. 

The Pickled Pirate takes place in Toronto, circa 1930. I've found a couple of lovely old Toronto maps on the Internwebs, which I have cherished and have used as a desktop wallpaper to keep me inspired (as if this is tricky to do). As I mentioned in a previous entry, The Pickled Pirate is closely associated with The Information Man, another novella of mine released last summer. Oswald and Rex Malin, the Malin brothers, are in The Pickled Pirate, though chiefly that role is reserved for Oswald. His superpower-infused brother makes a cameo later on. 

Spending all this time in the Toronto of my head, it is quite lovely that I am attending the Toronto Maple Leafs and Minnesota Wild Game this evening! By 1930, the Leafs were already an established team in the NHL (formerly of the OPHL, 1906-1909). They wouldn't move into old Maple Leaf Gardens until the following year, November of 1931. 

[Sidebar] I've never heard anyone talk about Maple Leaf Gardens without first adding "old" in front of it, like it's an article, a title, a prefix... like those granted to tribal leaders of ancient days. [/Sidebar]

But, er... I won't be rooting for the Leafs tonight. Unless the game is hopelessly one-sided, in favor of the Wild, then I will root for them, as I would root for competition and fair play no matter what. 

The Pickled Pirate, if it continues to go well and the Muses keep feasting, will be completed sooner than I thought, though it appears as though it is going to be much longer than first supposed. It's already 18,100 words.
partlyopenbook: (stache)
Ran into this today while doing research for After Dan & Steve Saved the World...

http://www.oldetowneeast.org/ote-couple-champions-marriage-equality/

I needed a part of Columbus to set a very tiny and minuscule piece of the book. And then I stumbled upon a bigger story. I'd heard it before, but this is the first time I'd ever actually read it. My apologies for taking so long.

So... Olde Town East will briefly be mentioned in Dan & Steve!

Well, back to work!
And wow is the weather scary...!

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